10 Spoonie tips on how to survive a heatwave

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The prolonged hot and humid weather we have been experiencing over the past few weeks, or is it months now?, has been challenging for everyone, but the discomfort is magnified when you have a chronic illness. If you have limited mobility and are confined to your bed for long periods of time, it can be hard to stay cool. Many people with chronic illnesses face problems regulating their body temperature and the heat also increases our heart rate, which can add to the distress experienced.

As I have explained before, I really struggle in the hot weather. Anything above 20 degrees C causes dizziness and palpitations, but I have picked up a few coping strategies over the years. Here are a few tips for keeping cool during a heatwave:

1. Reusable Ice packs.
Hug them, lay your head on them, place them on the back of your neck – or all of the above. I have 8 in total, I even have a dedicated mini freezer just for my ice packs. Please remember to wrap them in a piece of cloth or tea towel so the ice pack doesn’t burn your skin.

2. Wet flannels.
I always have a cold wet flannel draped over the back of my neck, and I sometimes add them to my wrists. This really helps me cool down and reduces dizziness.

3. Oscillating Fans.
I have a number of fans in the house and during the summer one fan is on 24/7. The breeze from an oscillating fan can cool your body down directly but it can also increase the airflow in your room. During the really hot weather try adding a container of ice in front of the fan, this will actually cool down the air immediately in front of the fan.

4. Cooling towel.
I discovered cooling towels (they are sometimes called ice towels) a few years ago. You wet them and squeeze out the excess water, and magically they are ice cold.  They stay cold for some time but you do need to wet them regularly. I place a cooling towel on the back of my neck, my head, or just draped over my body.

5. Cooling mat.
Cooling mats are quite popular for pets but as I spend most of my time confined to my bed, I decided to give them a go. I find they do help me stay cool but during the extremely hot weather my body temperature warms them up quite quickly. You can also buy cooling blankets.

6. Air conditioning unit.
This year, fed up with constant dizziness and palpitations during the summer, I invested in a portable air conditioning unit – it was the best £300 I have ever spent. It is quite loud, so due to my hypersensitivity I can’t have it on all the time, but it has been a lifesaver in our recent prolonged hot weather.

7. Keep windows and curtains closed during the hottest parts of the day.
I actually have blackout blinds which block the direct sunlight and heat from the sun. Blocking out direct sunlight can prevent your house from becoming a furnace. Keeping windows closed during the hottest part of the day also helps reduce the temperature in your house.

8. Open windows during the coolest parts of the day.
First thing in the morning and late at night, open all your windows and doors, these are the coolest times of the day. I have to admit I don’t sleep well during the summer, but my favourite time of the day is 4-5am – it’s the coolest time of the day and I open every door and window available.

9. Water spray bottles.
Fill a bottle with cold water and spritz your face and hair regularly. This will cool you down, even if only temporarily. If you sit or lay in front of a fan, the additional breeze will cool you down further. You can also buy cooling mist sprays. If you are able to, try having a cool shower or bath.

10. Stay hydrated.
This one may sound obvious but staying hydrated during hot weather can be challenging for those severely affected by chronic ill-health. I have multiple water cups in easy reach of my bed which my carers refill regularly. You could also keep a water jug or a few water bottles in the fridge, or even the freezer. Ice lollies are another way of staying hydrated and they also cool you down.

I know it can be tough surviving long hot summers when you have a chronic illness, but there are ways to reduce the stress and discomfort you experience. Try to avoid any unnecessary activity and wear lightweight, breathable clothing. When I overheat and my heart rate increases, I tend to get anxious which can lead to a panic attack – a nightmare in extreme heat. So, try to stay calm and practice activities that reduce your anxiety levels, like meditation. I hope these practical tips have helped. Take care x.

Do you have any tips you would like to add?

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3 Replies to “10 Spoonie tips on how to survive a heatwave”

  1. Good tips that I can use here, too! Out of curiosity, what is considered a ‘heatwave’ range there? Here 30s are normal, and bad would be upper 30s!

  2. In the UK our summertime temperatures are normally low to mid 20s. For 2-3 months now it’s been in the late 20s and above. It’s been above 30 degrees on quite a few days, the highest was 36 degrees. But our buildings aren’t designed for it, no air conditioning, and it’s been really humid too.

    1. Got ya. I was in Münich during one of its hottest summers ever and it was terrible, because there was no air conditioning or even a fan in the hotel room, etc. Yea I live in the tropics so it’s really hot and humid year round, and even so, I still haven’t gotten used to it, lol 😉 I hope the heatwave eases up soon for all of you there! x

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